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Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - bologna.lab - Neue Lehre. Neues Lernen

Lehrveranstaltungen im Sommersemester 2019

 

Agnes Kursplan SoSe 2019

 

Übersicht Sommersemester 2019

 

 

Bewerbungen sind ausschließlich über unser Online-Formular möglich

(nicht über Agnes!) im Zeitraum 7. März - 7. April 2019:

 

https://hu.berlin/bp-bewerbung

 

 

***Download: Seminarangebot (Broschüre Sommersemester 2019)***

 

Kultur und Gesellschaft

 

 

Mittwoch
16-20 ct.

Einzeltermine: 10./17./24. April, 8./15. Mai, 3./10. Juli + Exkursion 10. Mai (10-12)

(Erste Sitzung: 10.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0323-26

Kiez Cinema Culture: Cinemas in Berlin and their audience
Karl-Leontin Beger

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2, Deutsch A1-A2)

 

Are still more cinemas going out of business? Are there just huge multiplexes dominating the cityscape? Not everywhere. Berlin celebrates cinema culture in nearly 100 spaces from small shacks to expensively renovated pictures palaces. Each neighbourhood celebrates cinema. Various formats of frame programs and hybrid forms between gastronomy and classical cinema are reaching out for their niches. Explore Berlin’s cinema culture! Meet the cinema curators and the audiences! What does cinema mean to the Berliners and how do they shape it? The different aspects of Berlin’s cinema culture are researched on in project groups. Interviews, surveys and research are going to help you understand the essentials of Berlin’s cinema culture and what keeps the people behind the projectors going.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

Dienstag
14-18 ct.

Einzeltermine: 9./16./23. April, 7./14./21./28. Mai, 4. Juni

(Erste Sitzung: 09.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0323-26

Exploring Difficult Heritage Through Berlin Museums
Victoria Bishop Kendzia

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2)

 

This anthropologically inflected course is interdisciplinary in nature. The aim of the course is to explore and critically analyse certain key aspects of Berlin’s difficult heritage. The focus is on two particularly visible and conflict-ridden aspects of this landscape, namely the Jewish narrative and the topic of migration. The exploration will be realized through a variety of museum visits and text analyses. The museums, which are to be understood as dynamic field sites, will be approached using ethnographic methods.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

Freitag
10-12 ct.

(Erste Sitzung: 12.04.2019)

 

 

Raum: 0323-26

Berlin Objects: Grasping Cultural History through Artefacts and Edifices
Dr. Elisa Jochum

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2, Deutsch B1)

 

Berlin constitutes, what Andreas Huyssen has called, a vast physical and historical “palimpsest,” which registered a series of wars, political systems, cultural influences as well as major shifts in social and commercial life. The seminar approaches this city through specific artefacts and buildings – each of which has played a key role for modern Berlin and for the city’s significance in Germany. This course understands the term “objects” in a double sense: first, in the academic sense as objects of study; second, in the physical sense as material items that we can see and grasp and which, in turn, render cultural processes manifest. Artefacts, such as maps and DJ consoles, as well as buildings, such as the “Reichstag” and the “Spätkauf”, offer kaleidoscopic views onto a city which in its overwhelming historical density constantly evokes its many pasts and presents in the streetscape and yet always eludes our full grasp. Building on the academic methodology of micro-history, we will draw on the specific and the small to develop a tangible understanding of large-scale developments in Berlin. This seminar investigates what objects teach us about ways of living and surviving in this city and about forms of being political, social, modern, and creative in Berlin’s urban spaces. We will connect material artefacts to the socio-political climate in which people have created and used them. The seminar uses the widespread idea of Berlin as a museum – a museum that exhibits history in the cityscape; which has constantly been transforming itself; and which is continuously testing ideas about its past, present, and possible futures. As an avenue of making sense of this urban museum, we will create a digital exhibition of “Berlin Objects.”

 

 

 

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Syllabus

Montag
12-14 ct. 

3 längere Termine: Montag 29.4. / 13.5. /3.6. jeweils
10-14 ct.

(Erste Sitzung: 15.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0323-26

Image and the City – Perspectives on Berlin
Alessa Paluch

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2, Deutsch A1)

 

Capital of Cool, City of Tolerance and (affordable) Hub of Creativity – Berlin’s image is a very alluring one. The images of Berlin circulating in all kinds of media are just as interesting, but also surprisingly diversified. If this is true for contemporary Berlin it proves to be so even more in regard of its 20th century history: historic moments like the fall of the Berlin Wall are always also represented in images. But what does those images actually tell us? What do they mean and what do they want us to see?
Not just since the so called Iconic Turn academic research is highlighting the human urge for images and visualizations in its diverse variations. This seminar focuses on the double meaning of image as picture with a certain imaginative power (e.g. symbols, iconic images) and image as reputation. This double meaning reveals itself quite obviously in the context of the city, in this case: Berlin. The image(s) of Berlin is/are an interconnected mixture of past, present and hoped for future.
This seminar looks closer on some of these visualities – ranging from iconic photographs to music video clips to official marketing campaigns – and reflects their symbolic meaning and varying interpretations, their impact on Berlin's self-concept, identity, on its cultural scene and even on its economic value. To do so some basic concepts developed in the context of the Visual Culture Studies, with aspects of Art History, Film Studies, Metropolitan Studies, Tourism Studies and Social Science, are introduced.
The seminar aims to be an exercise in Visual Literacy (VL), enabling students to better understand, interpret and use images in their everyday life. Various methods, tools and strategies from VL are implemented, exercised and evaluated throughout the sessions.
To link content and form participants are asked to do a Visual Study Journal, documenting their learning aims, developments and achievements throughout the whole semester in a visual way. The educational concept of a Study Journal will be issued in class; no previous knowledge is required. At the end of the seminar this Visual Study Journal will be presented in a student organized exhibition.

 


 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

   

Mittwoch
10-12 ct.

(Erste Sitzung: 10.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0323-26

Berlin Sonic: Auditory Collective Explorations
Banu Çiçek Tülü/Samuel Perea-Díaz

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2, Deutsch A1)

 

This course explores Berlin’s sonic perspectives with an approach to architecture, urban planning, human and social sciences as well as art in our everyday life. In everyday life, our vision merges to our listening actions and therefore we continuously follow a rhythm which is created by our own actions and our surroundings. As an intuitive, non-cognitive and unconscious act, listening helps us to understand our environment. The listener creates individual and subjective images because of the fact that any acoustic format is visual. From the urban sonic perspective, every city and every urban space has a particular sonic identity for every individual. Central questions in the course are: What is the sound of Berlin? Which sonic elements in architecture, urban planning, art and cultural events have shaped berlin? How these projects are in relation to Berlin’s socio-political processes? In this course, we respond these questions through the interdisciplinary collective listening exercises with site visits, recordings, readings and discussions. We will examine cultural projects and develop, discover, analyze the urban environment with an approach that focuses on hearing and sound. We will draw a research line for exploring the city and understanding the current urban complexities with a specific methodology that considers the aural environment, acoustic ecologies and listening.

 

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Syllabus

Mittwoch
14-16 ct.

(Erste Sitzung: 10.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0323-26

Urban Activism in Berlin
Banu Çiçek Tülü

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B1, Deutsch A2)

 

Berlin is considered as multi-layered urban lab with contradictory landscape; luxury housing, big urban development projects next to squats, small urban garden projects, urban parks and green areas, etc. Over the course of the 1990s and 2000s till today, over 50 percent of the city’s public housing stock has been sold to private investors and the city has become a highly desirable destination for international property investment (Holm 2007). The lack of affordable housing and a rise in the speculative real-estate market spur new discussions about gentrification. Meanwhile, inhabitants and newcomers fight for their rights in the city. The focal point of this course is an examination of the changes associated with urban development in Berlin and “counter actions” as urban social movements. This interdisciplinary course explores Berlin through urban activism in with several lenses, including: housing, urban environmental activism, community gardening and political power relations in the city. In addition to that this course offers an analysis of right to the city, participation, social justice, urban resistance, grassroots organizing, and urban development policy. Within the broad theme of “urban activism”, the course focuses on the ways in which neighborhood/inhabitant experiences and citizens’ collide to produce different forms of resistance within Berlin’s political sphere.

 

 

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Syllabus

Freitag
12-16 ct.

Einzeltermine: 12./26. April, 3./17./31. Mai, 14./ 28. Juni

(Erste Sitzung: 12.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0323-26

The Cinematic Representation of Berlin in German and Turkish Migration Films
Dr. Deniz Güneş Yardımcı

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2, Deutsch A2)

 

The labour migration from Turkey to Germany, which started in the mid-1960s, had an important socio-economic and socio-cultural impact on both countries’ societies and influenced their film culture. German filmmakers began to feature the first guestworkers’ difficult lives in films such as Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Katzelmacher (1969) and Angst Essen Seele Auf/ Fear Eats Soul (1974). Later, German cinema began to cinematically capture the entire migrant family like in Shirins Hochzeit/ Shirin's Wedding (1975, Helma Sanders-Brahms) and Yasemin (1988, Hark Bohm). In the 1990s, second- and third-generation Turkish German directors such as Fatih Akın, Thomas Arslan, Ayşe Polat, Yüksel Yavuz, and Aysun Bademsoy marked the end of the so-called guestworker cinema (Gastarbeiterkino) of the 1970s and 1980s and started to create a transnational and diasporic cinema featuring a culturally hybrid Germany. Turkish cinema dealt with this migration phenomenon even in more than 60 films alone between 1960s and 1990s. Berlin (especially Kreuzberg) has always been one of the favourite settings in all of these migration movies. The transformation of Berlin’s first Guestworker Ghettos to culturally hybrid urban districts over the course of 60 years is very well reflected in all of these cinema cultures.
This interdisciplinary course crosses and connects the academic fields of migration studies, film studies, and cultural studies. In the first part of the course, we will explore how the socio-political and socio-cultural phenomenon of Turkish immigration into Germany, immigrants, and diasporas are represented in German and Turkish cinema from the 1960s until the present. The second part of the course then gets more specific and we approach the representation of Berlin in these migration movies.
In this course, students will gain knowledge about film analysis, German immigration history, and theoretical concepts dealing with migration, diaspora, stereotype, culture, and identity.

 

 

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Syllabus

Montag
14-16 s.t.

(Erste Sitzung: 15.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0323-26

 

Berlin Films
Dr. Stefanie Rinke

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B1, Deutsch B1, der Kurs findet größtenteils auf Deutsch statt)

 

Welche Geschichten über Berlin werden in Berlin-Filmen erzählt? Welches Berlin-Bild wird hierbei hergestellt? Diesen Fragen wird im Seminar anhand von Berlin-Filmen nachgegangen, die typische Lebensstile, spezifische historische Aspekte, typische Monumente der Stadt oder besondere Berlin-Typen zeigen. In diesem forschungsorientierten Seminar entwickeln die Studierenden in Gruppen selbst eine Forschungsfrage zum Thema und planen jeweils gemeinsam die Umsetzung ihres Gruppenforschungsprojekts. Ihre Forschungsergebnisse präsentieren die Gruppen anhand eines eigenen Films, eines Posters, einer Website oder einem anderen passenden Format. Studentische Motivation und Partizipation sind in diesem Kurs sehr zentral.

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Geschichte und Literatur

 

 

Dienstag 10-12 ct.

(Erste Sitzung: 09.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0203

 

 

Topographies of Jewish Identity in Berlin in the 20th and 21st Centuries
Dr. Russell Alt-Haaker

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2, Deutsch A1)

 

Over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Berlin has been home to a heterogeneous Jewish community, from “assimilated” German Jews during the Wilhelmine era, Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe during the Weimar Republic, and people of Jewish heritage who suffered under and sought to flee from the Nazi regime to a small post-war Jewish enclave in a divided Berlin and a vibrant Jewish community after reunification that now draws thousands of others from around the world to the city as their elective home. Through selected essays, satire, newspaper reports, memoirs, poems, photographs and graphic novels, we will discuss how Jewish identity has been negotiated against the backdrop of Berlin’s ever-changing socio-political landscape. In addition to mapping the literary terrain of Jewish identity in Berlin, we will pay special attention to urban sites that have played an important role in this process. As a result, this course pairs written works with a physical exploration of the city to paint a more detailed picture of our readings. Each week, you will be asked to visit a specific site to explore the spaces that feature in the texts or that provide important historical context for our discussions. By scratching the layers of history around us, we will also look at our own identity as elective Berliners and how we inhabit this city as members of the international community.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Dienstag
12-14 ct.

(Erste Sitzung: 09.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0323-26

Where Mack the Knife meets Mother Courage: Bertolt Brecht’s Berlin years
Carolin Sibilak

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2, Deutsch B2)

 

Ranked as one of the most popular German authors and playwrights of the 20th century, Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) became globally known even in life, and his texts, artistic ideas and experiments have been around ever since. In Berlin, “the city that makes clever”, he witnessed the turbulent times of the Weimar Republic before fleeing the National Socialists in 1933, and it was here that he saw the founding of the GDR after returning from exile in 1948. The socio-political incidents and developments of these years strongly influenced his life and work, which in turn allow us to relive the history and culture of Germany in general and Berlin in particular. Focusing mainly on Brecht’s poetry (i.a. Manual of Piety, Svendborg Poems, Buckow Elegies) and stage plays (i.a. The Threepenny Opera, Mother Courage and her Children) while also consulting autobiographical and theoretical writings, the bilingual seminar aims to trace possible connections between art, society and politics and to discuss aspects like artistic purpose and responsibility and political censorship. We will visit the Berlin Ensemble and Brecht’s former residence in midtown (with museum and archive) as well as a theatre performance as part of the course.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Donnerstag 10-12 ct.

 

(Erste Sitzung: 11.04.2019)

 

 

Raum: 0323-26

 

Magical Urbanism – Visions of the Metropolis in Literature and Film
Dr. Mareen van Marwyck

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2, Deutsch A2)

 

The literary and cinematic reception of the metropolis is often marked by the mysterious, the uncanny and the surreal. Urban experience seems to reject and transcend a „realistic“ way of perception. Magical urbanism reflects both, the threatening aspects of modernity as well as its utopian promises. The comparative and interdisciplinary seminar explores the history of urban fantasies in Berlin and London literature and discusses its aesthetical and political implications. We will read Chloe Arjidis’ celebrated surreal Berlin novel Book of Clouds and short excerpts of Walter Benjamin’s Berlin Childhood around 1900 and Alfred Döblin’s Berlin Alexanderplatz as well as the short story The Man of the Crowd by Edgar Allen Poe in English language. In German language, we will read two short stories Von einem, der alles doppelt sah by Martin Stade and Schlüssel by Rudolph Herzog. Reflecting the cinematographic tradition, we will discuss Fritz Lang’s movie Metropolis and the Matrix trilogy by Lana and Andy Wachowski. As theoretical background, we will read excerpts from Lucy Huskinson (ed.): The Urban Uncanny. A collection of interdisciplinary studies and Enda Duffy’s and Maurizia Boscagli’s introduction to Joyce, Benjamin and Magical Urbanism. European Joyce Studies 21 (2011).

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

Montag
16-18 ct.

(Erste Sitzung: 15.04.2019)

 

Raum: 0203

 

 

Twentieth Century Berlin: An Urban Historical Perspective
Lily Philipose

(Sprachanforderungen: Englisch B2)

 

Urban history is a form of historical inquiry that enriches our understanding of cities and urban landscapes, often using an interdisciplinary approach. This course is an introduction to specific points of interest in the political, social and cultural developments in Berlin between the 1920s and 1990s, showing how they illuminate German twentieth-century history. City sites, monuments and buildings are linked to collective memory, citizen participation and political debates. We learn about the fascinating stories behind twentieth-century social and political events, places, people, buildings and monuments in Berlin as presented by urban historians, but we also learn the basic principles and approaches of urban history. We make urban history come alive through site visits and city walks, and have a close-up look at an urban preservation project that brings this city’s history directly into the present moment.

 

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Mittwoch
12-14 ct.

 

(Erste Sitzung: 10.04.2019)

 

 

Raum: 0323-26

 

Berlin: Literature, History & Politics in the 20th and 21st Century
Friederike Knüpling

(Sprachanforderungen: Deutsch B1, der Kurs findet auf Deutsch statt)

 

Dieser Kurs nimmt die Stadt Berlin durch Auseinandersetzung mit literarischen, filmischen und einigen musikalischen Darstellungen Berlins in den Blick. Die Seminardiskussion wird einerseits erschließen, welche historisch-politischen Ereignisse unsere Kurstexte reflektieren, und andererseits die stimmungsmäßige Perspektivierung der Stadt durch verschiedene Epochen hindurch verfolgen. Themen des Seminars beinhalten das heutige Berlin als Anziehungspunkt für internationale Kreativarbeiter und Hipster, Berlin als migrantischer Ort, den Fall der Mauer und das geteilte Berlin, Studentenbewegungen und radikale Politik in Berlin, die Stadt im Nationalsozialismus, Berlin zur Zeit der Weimarer Republik, revolutionäre Zeiten und das deutsche Kaiserreich. Wir lesen und diskutieren Texte unter anderem von Walter Benjamin, Rosa Luxemburg, Paul Celan, Alfred Döblin, Hans Fallada, Emine Sevgi Özdamar und anderen. Der Kurs richtet sich besonders an internationale Studierende, die ihr Diskussionsdeutsch durch komplexe Lektüren, Seminargespräche und Verfassen kurzer Texte verbessern möchten. Sie sollten bei Semesterbeginn mindestens auf B1+ Niveau Deutsch sprechen.

 

 

 

 

 

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Syllabus