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Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - bologna.lab - Neue Lehre. Neues Lernen

Courses/Lehrveranstaltungen Winter Semester 2019/20

You can register for the Berlin Perspectives seminars via our online registration form (not Agnes!) from 2 September - 13 October 2019: https://hu.berlin/bp-registration

 

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Download: our brochure for the winter semester 2019/20

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Culture and Society / Kultur und Gesellschaft

 

 

Wednesday

14-16 c.t.

room 0323-26

DIVERSITY AND ETHNIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP OF BERLIN

You Kyung Byun

(Language requirements: English B2, German A1)

 

This course discovers the cultural diversity in Berlin's economic scape. Cultural diversity is a crucial term describing Berlin, where people with various ethnic background live together. This diversity is reflected in various business as well, such as ethnic restaurants, market places, and event location. For instance, more than 50 national cuisines are present among around 5000 restaurants in Berlin. This diversity of ethnic entrepreneurship is deeply involved in everyday life, such as doing grocery in a Turkish supermarket and having lunch in a Vietnamese restaurant. Ethnic entrepreneurship reflects multilayered connections of the local business to the origin of the represented culture and multicultural identity of the entrepreneurs. Who are the ethnic entrepreneurs in Berlin? How do they reproduce their national and international identity in their entrepreneurship? How does it interact with the city’s socioeconomic environment? This course aims to explore, critically analyze, and comprehend the cultural diversity and ethnic entrepreneurship in Berlin. Besides the introduction of key theoretical concepts to understand ethnic diversity of a global city, course participants will also work with the examples from Berlin’s multicultural economic sceneries to implement the learned theories in practices. For this purpose, participants are expected to conduct a small individual project to discover ethnic entrepreneurship in Berlin. Through these exercises, participants expect to develop individual perspectives in living together in a multicultural city.

 

 

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Wednesday

12-14 c.t.

room 0323-26

URBAN ACTIVISM BERLIN
Banu Çiçek Tülü

(Language requirements: English B1, German A2)

 

Berlin is considered a multi-layered urban lab with contradictory landscape; luxury housing, big urban development projects next to squats, small urban garden projects, urban parks and green areas, etc. Over the course of the 1990s and 2000s till today, over 50 percent of the city’s public housing stock has been sold to private investors and the city has become a highly desirable destination for international property investment. The lack of affordable housing and a rise in the speculative real-estate market spur new discussions about gentrification. Meanwhile, inhabitants and newcomers fight for their rights in the city. The focal point of this course is an examination of the changes associated with urban development in Berlin and “counter actions” as urban social movements. This interdisciplinary course explores Berlin through urban activism with several lenses, including: housing, urban environmental activism, community gardening and political power relations in the city. In addition to that this course offers an analysis of right to the city, participation, social justice, urban resistance, grassroots organizing, and urban development policy. Within the broad theme of “urban activism”, the course focuses on the ways in which neighborhood/inhabitant experiences and citizens’ collide to produce different forms of resistance within Berlin’s political sphere.

 

 

 

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Wednesday

16-18 c.t.

room 0323-26

BERLIN SONIC: AUDITORY COLLECTIVE EXPLORATIONS
Banu Çiçek Tülü / Samuel Perea-Díaz

(Language requirements: English B2, German A1)

 

This weekly course explores Berlin’s sonic perspectives with an approach to architecture, urban planning, human and social sciences as well as art in our everyday life. In everyday life, our vision merges to our listening actions and therefore we continuously follow a rhythm which is created by our own actions and our surroundings. As an intuitive, non-cognitive and unconscious act, listening helps us to understand our environment. The listener creates individual and subjective images because of the fact that any acoustic format is visual. From the urban sonic perspective, every city and every urban space has a particular sonic identity for every individual. Central questions in the course are: What is the sound of Berlin? Which sonic elements in architecture, urban planning, art and cultural events have shaped Berlin? How these projects are in relation to Berlin’s socio-political processes? In this course, we respond these questions through the interdisciplinary collective listening exercises with site visits, recordings, readings and discussions. We will examine cultural projects and develop, discover, analyze the urban environment with an approach that focuses on hearing and sound. We will draw a research line for exploring the city and understanding the current urban complexities with a specific methodology that considers the aural environment, acoustic ecologies and listening.

 

 

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Tuesday

14-18 c.t.

(individual session dates)

room 0323-26

EXPLORING BERLIN MUSEUMS
Victoria Bishop Kendzia

(Language requirements: English B2)

 

This anthropologically inflected course is interdisciplinary in nature. The aim of the course is to explore and critically analyze certain key aspects of Berlin’s museological landscape, using anthropological methods. This will be realized during the various field trips to relevant sites. The focus is on two particularly visible and conflict-ridden aspects of this landscape, namely the Jewish narrative and the topic of migration.

The students will get to know a number of Berlin museums using anthropological methods and to critically analyse them within a larger theoretical framework of “self” and “other” constructions. They will explore the role of museums in rendering such constructions visible and therefore debatable. We will work with both English and German language texts and exhibitions.

 

 

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Wednesday

10-12 c.t.

room 0323-26

GARDENS OF BERLIN: TRANSDISCIPLINARY ECOLOGY
Shelley Etkin

(Language requirements: English B2)

 

Gardens of Berlin: Transdisciplinary Ecology offers encounters with several unique urban garden projects in Berlin. What do these gardens do, in the contexts where they grow, and within the city at large? Who gathers in those gardens and how? This course offers an opportunity to situate questions of planetary change through the study of Berlin as a complex ecosystem, gaining in-depth perspectives through its urban gardens and their human and non-human communities. The course will explore the range of disciplines that inform the field of ecology ranging from environmental, to mental and social, as well as spiritual. From plants to political dynamics, activism to artistry, the urban gardens studied will reflect the diverse topography of Berlin’s ecology. Site visits will include conversations with local organisers and readings will contextualise their histories and approaches along with theory from the transdisciplinary field of ecology. This course offers skills, insights, and questions to develop ecological thinking, embracing the wide range of cultural and academic backgrounds that students will contribute. There is no requirement for students to have previous familiarity with the subject, only a willingness to engage in readings, discussions, and site visits, as well as verbal and written reflections.

 

 

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Monday

12-14 c.t.

room 0323-26

IMAGE AND THE CITY
Alessa Paluch

(Language requirements: English B2, German A1)

 

Capital of Cool, City of Tolerance and (affordable) Hub of Creativity – Berlin’s image is an alluring one. The images of Berlin circulating in all kinds of media are just as interesting, but also surprisingly diversified. If this is true for contemporary Berlin it proves to be so even more in regard of its 20th century history. But what do those images actually tell us?

This seminar focuses on the double meaning of image as picture with a certain imaginative power (e.g. symbols, iconic images) and image as reputation. In a journey through Berlin’s (and Germany’s) Visual Culture we look closer on some of its visualities – from iconic photographs to music video clips, movies and documentaries to official marketing campaigns – and reflect on their symbolic meaning and varying interpretations, their impact on Berlin's self-concept, identity, on its cultural scene and even on its economic value. Basic theoretical concepts of the Visual Culture Studies et al. are introduced.
The seminar aims to be an exercise in Visual Literacy (VL), enabling students to better understand, interpret and use images in their everyday life.

 

 

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History and Literature / Geschichte und Literatur

 

 

Tuesday

10-12 c.t.

room 0203

 

TOPOGRAPHIES OF JEWISH IDENTITY IN BERLIN IN THE 20th AND 21st CENTURIES
Russel Alt-Haaker

(Language requirements: English B2, German A1)

 

 

Over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Berlin has been home to a heterogeneous Jewish community, from “assimilated” German Jews during the Wilhelmine era, Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe during the Weimar Republic, and people of Jewish heritage who suffered under and sought to flee from the Nazi regime to a small post-war Jewish enclave in a divided Berlin and a vibrant Jewish community after reunification that now draws thousands of others from around the world to the city as their elective home. Through selected essays, satire, newspaper reports, memoirs, poems, photographs and graphic memoirs, we will discuss how Jewish identity has been negotiated against the backdrop of Berlin’s ever-changing socio-political landscape. In addition to mapping the literary terrain of Jewish identity in Berlin, we will pay special attention to urban sites that have played an important role in this process. As a result, this course pairs written works with a physical exploration of the city to paint a more detailed picture of our readings. You will be asked to visit specific sites to explore the spaces that feature in the texts or that provide important historical context for our discussions. By scratching the layers of history around us, we will also look at our own identity as elective Berliners and how we inhabit this city as members of the international community.

 

 

 

 

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Fri/Sat/Sun

12-18 c.t.

(block seminar)

room 0323-26

CINEMATIC REPRESENTATION OF BERLIN IN GERMAN AND TURKISH MIGRATION FILMS
Deniz Yardımcı

(Language requirements: English B2, German A2)

 

The labour migration from Turkey to Germany, which started in the mid-1960s, had an important socio-economic and socio-cultural impact on both countries’ societies and influenced their film culture. German filmmakers began to feature the first guestworkers’ difficult lives in films. Turkish cinema dealt with this migration phenomenon even in more than 60 films alone between 1960s and 1990s. Berlin (especially Kreuzberg) has always been one of the favourite settings in all of these migration movies. The transformation of Berlin’s first Guestworker Ghettos to culturally hybrid urban districts over the course of 60 years is very well reflected in all of these cinema cultures. This interdisciplinary course crosses and connects the academic fields of migration studies, film studies, and cultural studies. In the first part of the course, we will explore how the socio-political and socio-cultural phenomenon of Turkish immigration into Germany, immigrants, and diasporas are represented in German and Turkish cinema from the 1960s until the present. The second part of the course then gets more specific and we approach the representation of Berlin in these migration movies.

 

 

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Tuesday

12-14 c.t.

room 0323-26

 

EXCESS, EXPERIMENT, EXPOSURE: THEATER IN BERLIN
Caroline Sibilak

(Language requirements: English B2, German B1)

 

“Berlin has to become the city of theater in Europe”, king Frederick the Great demanded and basically started Berlin’s rich theatrical tradition, which has been shaped by world-renowned artists and saw famous premieres and productions. Because of the city’s status as a capital and cultural metropolis politics, society and art have always been closely linked here and influenced each other. Exploring three theatrical phenomena of the 20th century, which are unique to Berlin but have also had a worldwide impact, this bilingual seminar traces connections between sociopolitical developments and art in a historical and contemporary context and discusses aspects like artistic purpose, responsibility and censorship. The Berlin operetta, a hybrid genre integrating modern dance, jazz and chanson, can be considered a seismograph of the Roaring Twenties, addressing globalization, urbanity, gender roles and sexuality. Its existence and reputation were shattered by the National Socialists, who also forced German-born dramatist Bertolt Brecht into exile. He later re-turned to East Berlin and founded the Berliner Ensemble in 1949, which we will tour during the seminar. In West Berlin the Schaubühne became the most famous stage, where Peter Stein introduced a system of codetermination and staged several experimental productions in the 1970s. We will visit two theater performances as part of the course.

 

 

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Monday

14-18 c.t.

(individual session dates)

room 0323-26

 

TWENTIETH CENTURY BERLIN: AN URBAN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
Lily Philipose

(Language requirements: English B2)

 

Urban history is a form of historical inquiry that enriches our understanding of cities and urban landscapes, often using an interdisciplinary approach. This course is an introduction to specific points of interest in the political, social and cultural developments in Berlin between the 1920s and 1990s, showing how they illuminate German twentieth-century history. City sites, monuments and buildings are linked to collective memory, contested space, authentic sites, grassroots movements of memorialization and politicized debates.

We learn about the fascinating stories behind twentieth-century political events, buildings, monuments and memorial entrepreneurs in Berlin, but we also learn the basic principles and approaches of urban history. We make urban history come alive through site visits and city walks, and have a close-up look at an ongoing historical preservation project that brings this city’s urban history directly into the present moment.

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday

12-14 c.t.

+ Friday 7.2.2020, 14-16 c.t. (instead of 30.10.2019)

room 0203

 

BERLIN: LITERATURE, HISTORY & POLITICS IN THE 20th AND 21st CENTURY
Friederike Knüpling / Idan Gillo

(Language requirements:  German B1, the course will be in German)

 

This course explores the city of Berlin through key contemporary and twentieth century prose as well as poems, films, and music. Class discussions will focus on Berlin as the stage for crucial events in world history and on representations of the city in German literature. Topics include contemporary Berlin as a magnet for international bohemians and hipsters, migration to Berlin, the fall of the Berlin wall, student movements and radical politics in the city, cold war Berlin, the city under National Socialism, Weimar republic, revolutionary times, and the German Empire. We will read and discuss Walter Benjamin, Rosa Luxemburg, Paul Celan, Alfred Döblin, Hans Fallada, Emine Sevgi Özdamar and others. The course is taught in German for students who have acquired at least the equivalent of B1+ in German. In cases of doubt, please seek instructor’s consent.

 

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Thrusday

12-14 c.t.

room 0323-26

PHILOSOPHY IN BERLIN II: PHILOSOPHY AND THE UNIVERSITY

Benjamin Wilck

(Language requirements: English B2, German B1)

 

The course explores the origins and objectives of philosophy in the Prussian Berlin of the 19th century, and also provides a critical perspective on its subsequent history in the 20th century until today. Humboldt University Berlin was founded in 1809/10 under the name “Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität” as a result of revolutionist treatises on university reforms by philosophers in Berlin such as Fichte, Hegel, von Humboldt, and Schleiermacher. In particular, Wilhelm von Humboldt had the idea to create a new kind of university, in which teaching and research form a unity, in which science is independent of political and economic interests, and in which students receive an universal education. Consequently, Humboldt University Berlin became the worldwide paradigm of a new era of university and science. In reading texts written by Berlin-based philosophers before, during, and after the establishment of the Humboldt University, we will trace how ideas relating to the structure and purpose of the university and academic teaching and scientific research changed and were implemented in the course of the last two centuries

 

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