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Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - bologna.lab – New Teaching. New Learning

Summer Semester 2015

 

 

History, Politics and Social Sciences

Monday
12:00-14:00

Room 0323

The EAST/WEST Competition – Urban Planning, Cultural Policy and Economics in Divided Berlin

Michael Grass

(in English)

Berlin is the city of East / West competition. Since the division of the city into East and West, demonstrating the power of the capitalism and socialism respectively was central to urban planning. In the beginning, the solution of obstacles to urban development proved vital. This seminar examines the dualism in urban planning between East and West Berlin chronologically. Seminar presentations and two excursions trace the diverse targets and demands of capitalist and socialist urban planning. For the analysis, we do not only consider architectural and formal aspects. The Seminar provides a closer look to strategies and models of financing and commercialisation of urban planning. Cultural contexts, living and dwelling models and political strategies will be looked at as well.

Monday
14:00-16:00

Room 0323

Between Rejection and Recognition: Jewish Migration to Germany in the Past and Present

Dr. Agnieszka Pufelska/Donna Swarthout

(Co-Teaching/in English and German)

After Israel and the USA, Germany is the most important country of migration for Jewish immigrants worldwide. Jewish migration is not just a phenomenon of recent decades, but is also anchored in history. There was a strong Jewish migration from Eastern Europe to Germany as early as the late 19th century. In particular, after the Holocaust there were East European Displaced Persons who founded new Jewish communities in Germany. With the collapse of the Eastern Bloc, Jewish migration from the Soviet Union fundamentally changed Jewish life in Germany. Since the fall of the wall, a total of 220,000 people have come to Germany within the context of “Jewish immigration.” In recent years there has also been an increase in migration of Jews from Israel, France and the U.S. The goal of the seminar is to address Jewish migration as a part of Germany's past and present and to explore how the non-Jewish majority approaches the integration of Jewish immigrants. We are generally concerned with the prospects for integration of a minority into a multi-ethnic society.

Ttuesday
10:00-14:00

(every 14 days)

Room 0323

Changes in Berlin's Social Landscape over the Last Three Decades

Astrid Sundsbø/Jana Kunze

(Co-Teaching/ in English with some German depending on participants' skills)
From being a divided city on the frontline of two different world regimes, Berlin has developed more and more into a global metropolis. The change of the geo-political context of the city has also led to changes in its social structure, which has become more obvious in certain parts of the city than in others. Established population groups moved away, other groups moved in and shaped these areas in different ways. After the Fall of the Berlin Wall, the first striking changes occurred in the area of Prenzlauer Berg. These developments have been documented in various academic studies. In this seminar, the attention will be drawn towards other parts of the city, which have also gone through a tremendous change in their social structure over the last three decades, yet received less attention from the scientific community. The aim will be to gather information about the developments of these areas and to understand the underlying mechanisms and causes by drawing on different perspectives and sources.
 

Tuesday
16:00-18:00

Room 0323

Berlin, 1945-1990: Divided City

Dr. Peter Mitchell

(in English)

This seminar will provide insights into the key political developments in Berlin’s recent history, from the fall of the Third Reich, through the decades of political and physical division, to the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and Germany’s subsequent reunification.

 

Friday

14:00-16:00

Room 0323

Migration and Integration of Muslim Communities in Berlin and Germany in Comparative Perspective

Dr. Mehtap Söyler

(in English with some German depending on participants' skills)

This course is designed to familiarize students with 1) the concepts and issues concerning the migration and integration of Muslim Communities in Europe, 2) the current composition and representation of Muslim Communities in Berlin and Germany, 3) specific public policies that are geared to tackle complex issues emanating from intercultural challenges in Berlin and Germany, and put these insights into a 4) comparative perspective with other major countries of the European Union with Muslim immigrant population. It encompasses comparative public policy, intercultural dialogue, internal security, and political Islam. Students will be empowered to analyse the multi-faceted dimensions of immigration in Germany and the strategic importance of Muslim communities in Berlin. In addition, they will gain a European perspective in assessing dialogue and cooperation with Muslim Communities. They will develop a deeper understanding of the intercultural communication aspects and perspectives of integration.

Friday

16:00-18:00

Room 0323

Empire's Economy, 1848-1948

Frank Beyersdorf

(in English)

This course surveys German economic history from a social and cultural perspective from 1848 to 1948. Based on Berlin case studies, we will analyze how businesspersons and state officials interacted and regulated markets for goods, capital, and work between planned and free market on local, national, and global levels.

   
 

 

Literature, Urban and Cultural Studies

Tuesday
10:00-14:00

(every 14 days)

Room 0323

Berlin portrait of a city. An introduction to creative urban research 

Anna Blattner

(in English and German; A2 skills in German necessary)

Various aspects characterize a city: its history, materiality, everyday life and politics - to name only a few. Research in the urban field requires methods that can adapt to a number of situations and can capture the changing natures of a city. For instance, the materiality of a street can hardly be analysed with the same means as the quotidian life of its inhabitants, being different every hour of the day. The focus of the course is on urban research based on a creative methodology. Fields of study will include Sociology, Art, Philosophy, Literature, Geography and Urban Planning. In order to develop their own portrait of Berlin, participants will be introduced to a selection of creative methods of urban research such as walking, photography, mapping, soundscapes, observation and smell.

 

Tuesday

14:00-16:00

Room 0323

Re/Inventing Berlin - Architecture after 1945

Alessa Paluch

(in English)

At the end of World War II Berlin , the former capital of Hitlers Third Reich, was largely destroyed. But the area-wide destructions also held a chance: the possibility to rebuild Berlin as a totally new city – in modernists words: as a better city. And indeed Berlin changed dramatically – but not in the way modern architects and urban planners had envisioned it in the post-war period.

Quite differing proposals were made in East and West Berlin. Especially for the so called Capital of the Cold War it proves to be true that architecture is a not just a mirror to the society which builds it – but that architecture also shapes the lives of the people living with and within it.

Using examples such as Karl-Marx-Allee, Hansaviertel, Gropiusstadt, Potsdamer Platz et al. this seminar retraces the stations and phases of reconstruction with a focus on political and cultural developments. The most influential concepts of 20th century urban planning will be presented. In addition the seminar aims to be an exercise in (architecture) criticism.

 

Wednesday
10:00-12:00

Room 0323

Popliteratur. Autorschaft – Textverfahren – Institutionen

Katharina Kreuzpaintner

(in German and English)

Pop ist „alles was knallt“. So beschreibt der Literaturwissenschaftler Jost Hermand 1971 das noch neue ästhetische und kulturelle Phänomen treffend, wenn auch nicht unbedingt wohlwollend. In Deutschland wird der Popkultur vor allem in den neunziger Jahren und hier speziell über das Label ‚Popliteratur‘ zuerst in den Feuilletons und in der Folge auch von der Literaturwissenschaft
einige Aufmerksamkeit gewidmet. Das Seminar wird sich mit der in dieser Zeit entstandenen Literatur beschäftigen, diese aber auch im Bezug auf ihre markanten Weichenstellungen im deutschsprachigen Diskurs untersuchen, sowie die Entwicklung popkultureller Schreibweisen bis in die Gegenwart hinein verfolgen. Die Auseinandersetzung mit Konzeptionen von Autorschaft, Textverfahren und maßgeblichen Institutionen soll an einer Reihe von unterschiedlichen Texten, aber auch Fernsehmitschnitten und Popsongs, zeigen, wie genau sich das Phänomen der Popliteratur konstituiert und was dabei auf dem Spiel steht.

Thursday
12:00-14:00

Room 0323

Narrating the City - Berlin-Romane des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts 

Dr. Mareen van Marwyck

(in German)

Die Stadt Berlin ist im 20. und 21. Jahrhundert immer wieder Sujet, „Protagonist“ und nicht zuletzt auch Produkt literarischer Fantasien. In Feuilleton und Literaturwissenschaft hat sich der Begriff „Berlin-Roman“ durchgesetzt, der eine eigenständige Untergattung des Romans suggeriert.

Vor allem in den zwanziger Jahren, in der Nachwendeliteratur der neunziger Jahre sowie in der zeitgenössischen Literatur ist Berlin ein zentraler literarischer Topos. Im Roman als präferierter Form wird das Verhältnis von Individuum und Stadt ausgelotet und mit neuen urbanen Wahrnehmungsformen experimentiert. Dieses Seminar untersucht den Berlin-Roman und seine spezifischen Fragestellungen: die Großstadt als Lebensumfeld, Identität und als Zentrum der Moderne, vor dem Hintergrund der großen historischen Umbrüche und politischen Katastrophen des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts.

Thursday

14:00-16:00

Room 0323

Berlin and the Golden Twenties.

Johannes Kreimeier

(in German and English)

In the 1920s, in times of political unrest and economic misery Berlin emerged as a place of great artistic creativity and social change. The permanent confrontation with persisting unprogressive social structures and mindsets led to an enduring political and social destabilization, though simultaneously it was the engine of artistic productivity.

This seminar focuses on the most prominent aspects of the cultural, artistic, social, economic, and political development.

The seminar is geared towards students of the Arts and Humanities. It will be taught primarily in German, but we will consider language barriers and difficulties. Comments, presentations and essays in English are welcome.

Thursday

16:00-19:00

Room 0323

A Taste of Berlin 

Linda-Rabea Heyden/Marie Schröer

(Co-Teaching/in English and German)

Eating is an everyday practice, so profane it seems to be just a physical necessity to stay alive. Its ubiquity easily hides the variety of discourses and the many sign systems that influence and are linked to the simple gesture of eating and preparing food. Who eats what and where refers to the history, culture and conception of a region and its inhabitants. In return, national and regional habits of eating find their linguistic expression in idioms and metaphors. For individuals and social groups alike, food serves as a marker of identity and a means of distinction - symbolism, ritual behavior, myths, themes and motives of food and eating can be read and analyzed as signs(ystems). In addition to foundational theoretical texts from the culture and social sciences and on Berlin (food) culture, we will analyze different representations of food and the acts and places of eating in literature (Döblin), film (Good bye, Lenin!), art (Zille) and comics (Mawil). In order to further German language proficiency we will focus especially on metaphors and idioms involving food and eating in everyday speech as well as their function in literary texts. The intellectual intake is complimented by the practical-sensuous discovery of Berlin and its regional specialties. We will make excursions to various eateries to discover the different flavors of Berlin as well as explore food related places like the currywurst museum.

 

Friday
10:00-12:00

Room 0323

Dr. Stefanie Rinke

(in English and German)

The seminar focuses on Berlin in the years 1920s and 1930s. It deals with the cultural practices, in particular the art of taking a walk (strolling) and the consumer culture, and analyses those cultural practices by reading literature and film. To learn about the intersection of literature and practices, e.g. concerning reading the street like a book, and experiences in the city, the seminar takes place in the form of seminar sessions, studying texts in close reading, and study trips throughout town (excursion sessions). The languages in class will be English and German. The close reading of the German texts and the study of the key words will be mostly in German. Excursions will take place in English, the short presentations can be done in either English or German.

 

Im Seminar geht es darum, das Berlin der 1920er und 1930er Jahre zu erforschen. Die zu dieser Zeit entwickelten Kulturpraktiken der Großstadt, wie Flanerie und die mit der consumer culture einhergehenden Techniken, werden erarbeitet und ausgewählte Literaturen und Filme der Zeit diesbezüglich analysiert und hinsichtlich der damaligen Orte und Lebenserfahrungen kontextualisiert. Um insbesondere die Verschränkung von Literatur sowie Film und Stadterfahrung insbesondere
Flanerie kennen zu lernen, setzt das Seminar auf eine Mischung aus Seminarsitzungen in der Universität, in denen Texte und zentrale Begriffe und Konzepte zur Berliner Literatur der 1920er und 1930er Jahre studiert werden, und Exkursionen in die Stadt. Die Lektüre der Texte und die Erarbeitung der zentrale Begriffe finden, wenn möglich, in deutscher
Sprache statt. Die Exkursion in englischer Sprache. Die Kurzreferate werden auf Englisch oder Deutsch präsentiert.