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Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - bologna.lab – New Teaching. New Learning

Courses: Summer Semester 2018

 

Please note the language requirements for all our seminars!

 

Monday, 16. April 2018: Tag der Lehre at HU

Come and talk to us during the Berlin Perspectives open office hours from 11:00-13:00, and 14:00-16:00

 

 

Berlin Perspectives via Agnes

 


 
 

Social Sciences, History, Economics

 

 

 

Monday
12:00-14:00
(starts: 23.04)

Room: 0323-26

Urban Activism in Berlin

Banu Çiçek Tülü/ Duygu Kaban

(Language requirements: min. English B2, German A2)

 

Berlin has a multi-layered and contradictory landscape; high-rise buildings and gated communities next to squats, dense urban areas next to a huge urban park, etc. Over the course of the 1990s and 2000s, over 50 percent of the city’s public housing stock has been sold to private investors and the city has become a highly desirable destination for international property investment (Holm 2007). The lack of affordable housing and a rise in the speculative real-estate market spur new discussions about gentrification. Meanwhile, inhabitants and newcomers fight for their rights in the city.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Tuesday
12:00-14:00
(starts: 17.04)

Room: 0203

Rethinking the Migrant

Amber Kepple Jones

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

In January 2016, The Sun, the most highly read “newspaper” in the UK, published an article with the headline: “Refugee Crisis: Berlin so swamped by migrants that city is in ruins”. Though such hyperbolic claims are often quickly dismissed, they also echo and reiterate fears existing within hegemonic discourses surrounding “migrants” and reflect public consciousnesses about the “crisis” in not only the UK but in Berlin, in Germany and, more generally, the Global North. This interdisciplinary course seeks to contextualize and deconstruct the figure of the migrant using critical interdisciplinary approaches while placing them into wider discussions of the various related “crises” in “raceless”, postcolonial Europe.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Tuesday
14:00-16:00
(
starts: 17.04)

Room: 0323-26

The EAST/WEST Competition - Urban Planning, Cultural Policy And Economics in Divided Berlin

Michael Grass

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Berlin is the city of East / West competition. Since the division of the city into East and West, demonstrating the power of the capitalism and socialism respectively was central to urban planning. Shortly after the war, the solution of obstacles to urban development proved vital, but the ideological usability of economic strategies and architectural prototypes soon became an essential concern urban redevelopment policy of both nations.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

Wednesday
12:00-14:00
(starts: 18.04)

Room: 0323-26

"Aufarbeitung": Dealing with difficult pasts - in Berlin and elsewhere

Elena Demke

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

 

The German term “Aufarbeitung” is often considered to be “untranslatable”, at least not to be captured by one word in English. However, struggles of coming to terms with an unjust, violent and often murderous past can be studied worldwide. Originally referring to Germany’s obligation to confront its Nazi past, “Aufarbeitung” in Germany today concerns also the legacy of the SED-rule in Communist East Germany as well as transgressions and injustices that were committed on either side of the Cold War frontier, such as violence against children in institutions and families.  The seminar will introduce students to the historical background and theory of “Aufarbeitung” and related concepts such as “transitional justice” and “politics of memory” and ask for the role these concepts grant to memorialization. Students will study the history, aims and practices of some of the major memorial sites, state commissions and NGO’s addressing difficult pasts in Berlin. These are considered as case studies that help us to focus on general questions such as: Who are the agents, what the aims and what the effects of “Aufarbeitung”? What processes of inclusion or exclusion can be observed? The last phase of the seminar will be dedicated to the in-depth study of practices of “Aufarbeitung” from different contexts and countries – students are invited to set the agenda collaboratively. Final assignments will be contributions for a joined teamwork product (blog, podcast ...) on “Aufarbeitung – a German thing?” (this is a working title, decision on final title will be made collectively).

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

   

 

 

 

Literature, Urban and Cultural Studies

 

 

 

Monday
14:00-18:00
(starts: 23.04)

Room: 0323-26

 

Traces and Memory of German colonialism in Africa in Berlin's urban and cultural landscapes

Yann Le Gall

(Language requirements: min. English B2, German A2)

 

This course will introduce international students to visible traces of German colonialism in the Berlin urban landscape. Departing from streets in the so-called “African quarter” in Wedding and the experience of local initiatives who have all been committed for an earnest remembrance of the genocides of the Herero and Nama, the Maji Maji War in former German East-Africa, or the entanglements between colonialism and present-day racism. Through discussion and a guided excursion in the city, we will address some important concepts of memory studies while engaging in a search for traces of the German colonial past in Berlin and connected histories of colonial violence remembered in memorials, exhibitions, performances and literature. On this basis, the course will introduce contemporary cultural projects which have anchored German colonial imperialism in contemporary debates on racism, discrimination and geopolitics.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

 

Tuesday
12:00-14:00

(starts: 17.04)

Room: 0323-26

Image and the City

Alessa Katharina Paluch

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Capital of Cool, City of Tolerance and (affordable) Hub of Creativity – Berlin’s image is a very alluring one. The images of Berlin circulating in all kinds of media are just as interesting, but also surprisingly diversified. If this is true for contemporary Berlin it proves to be so even more in regard of its 20th century history: historic moments like the fall of the Berlin Wall are always also represented in images. But what do those images actually tell us? What do they mean and what do they want us to see?

This seminar is meant to be an expedition into Berlins and Germanys Visual Culture. We are going to have a closer look on some of these images – ranging from iconic photographs to music video clips to official marketing campaigns – and reflect their symbolic meaning and varying interpretations, their impact on Berlin's self-concept, identity, on its cultural scene and even on its economic value. Basic concepts developed in the context of the Visual Culture Studies are introduced, with aspects of Art History, Film Studies, Metropolitan Studies, Tourism Studies and Social Science.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

 

Tuesday
14:00-18:00
(starts: 17.04 / ends: 12.06)

Room: 0203

 

Exploring Berlin Museums

Dr. Victoria Bishop-Kendzia

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

This anthropologically inflected course is interdisciplinary in nature. The aim of the course is to explore and critically analyze certain aspects of Berlin’s museological landscape using anthropological methods. This will be realized during the various field trips to relevant sites. The focus is on two particularly visible and conflict-ridden aspects of this landscape, namely the Jewish narrative and the topic of migration.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Tuesday
16:00-18:00
(starts: 17.04)

Room: 0323-26

 

Twentieth-Century Berlin: An Urban Historical Perspective

Lily Philipose

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Urban history is a form of historical inquiry that enriches our understanding of cities and urban landscapes, often using an interdisciplinary approach. This course is an introduction to specific points of interest in the political, social and cultural developments in Berlin be-tween the 1920s and the 1990s, showing how they illuminate German twentieth-century history. It links city sites, monuments and buildings to collective memory and political de-bates.

We learn about the fascinating stories of twentieth-century political events, places, people, buildings and monuments in Berlin presented by three urban historians, and we also learn the basic principles and approaches of urban history. We make urban history come alive through audio-guide narrated city walks, develop our own piece of micro-history by re-searching neighborhoods, and take part in an urban preservation project — restoration of the Alexander Haus in Groß Glienicke — that brings this city’s urban history into the present.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

 

Wednesday
10:00-12:00

(starts: 18.04)

Room: 0323-26

 

Berlins Pop in Alltag und Kultur - Laboratorien im Niemandsland

Lucia Geis

(Language requirements: min. German B1)

 

1989: During the summer months, the first Love Parade dances up and down the Kurfürstendamm. In November, the wall comes down. All at once, Berlin is open and turning upside down. Adventurers, curious people and novelty seekers conquer a city that has entered transition. They observe, design and experiment - with language, with art, with music, with lifestyle. A new - perhaps the first - kind of "pop culture" made in Germany is emerging, looking for places other than theatres, concert halls and established forums of the so-called "high culture". The pop protagonists scratch in clubs, perform in empty houses and containers, experiment with new forms of writing on the Internet and new ways of life in everyday life. This seminar is ideal for students who wish to further their German skills.

 

 

 

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Wednesday
14:00-18:00

bi-weekly

(starts: 18.04)

Room: 0323-26

 

Berlin in the Twentieth Century: A Cultural Topography

Dr. Rositza Alexandrova

(Language requirements: min. English B2, German A1-A2)

 

Taking Andrew J. Webber’s eponymous recent study on Berlin as our updated travel guide to the physical localities of literature, art, political strife and philosophical resignation in the German capital, we will explore the constant interpretative effort that is encapsulated in a walk and consider perambulation itself as a scriptural paradigm. To this end, we will alternate our intensive seminar sessions with journeys to significant “Schauplätze der Evidenz”, libraries, museums, commemorative facades and relegated clubs, but also authors’ lived interiors, street corners and kiosks, as well as iconic urban areas and architectural emblems. In preparation for these field trips, we will read each time a chapter from our primer in English and decide on short German-language excerpts from the works addressed in this particular chapter, which we will then read and discuss in class. Such close textual and sometimes film analysis in this dual linguistic modality will allow us to reflect not least on theories of translation and intercultural transfer, in which accented expression, infelicities of meaning and even irritant code switching combine to strengthen and enrich the process of academic integration.

 

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Thursday
10:00-12:00

(starts: 19.04)

Room: 0323-26

Berlin Films

Dr. Stefanie Rinke

(Language requirements: min. English B1, German B1)

 

A lot of films are made in Berlin, but not every film could be called a „Berlin Film“. A film is a Berlin Film, so the definition in class, when the film shows special places of Berlin, when it shows a particular life-style or specific historical, cultural or political events. Only Berlin Films construct the identity of the metropole Berlin and are part of the thick space of a metropole: are intermingled in (imaginary) city relations. This seminar is ideal for students who wish to further their German skills.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Friday
14:00-16:00

(starts: 20.04)

Room: 0323-26

Contemporary Art in Berlin

Bonnie Begusch

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

What makes Berlin the art world’s darling, and does it still live up to the myth? This course provides an introduction to contemporary art while simultaneously creating a framework within which to actively explore and analyze the city’s rich and varied cultural offerings. Through readings, writing exercises, and field trips to galleries, artist-run spaces, studios, and private collections, students will gain a unique insider’s perspective to Berlin’s vibrant international art scene and the cultural issues shaping the city today.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Seminar overview of all Berlin Perspectives seminars

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