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Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - bologna.lab – New Teaching. New Learning

Courses: Winter Semester 2018/19

 

Please note the language requirements for all our seminars!

 

Monday, 15. October 2018: Tag der Lehre at HU

Come and talk to us during the Berlin Perspectives open office hours from 11:00-13:00, and 14:00-16:00

 

 

Berlin Perspectives via Agnes

 


 
 

Social Sciences, History, Economics

 

 

 

Monday
16:00-18:00
(starts: 22.10.)

Room: 0323-26

National Identity in Contemporary Germany: Citizenship, Diversity, and Belonging

Ursula Moffitt

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

In this course we will explore elite and everyday notions of citizenship and identity. Germany is a culturally and ethnically diverse country, and has been for many decades. Yet, it was only in the year 2000 that laws were changed to allow for non-heritage based citizenship, and only in the past few years that politicians began to acknowledge Germany as a country of immigration. In common usage, the word “German” is still often used to mean exclusively White Germans, drawing a boundary between those with and without so-called migration background. We will discuss the impact of such interpersonal issues, as well as more policy-based regulations using psychological, sociological, and related theories, examining how understandings of German identity affect norms (re)produced in media, policy, education, and everyday life. A focus will be given to narrative and discourse, both as tools for analysis and ways of understanding identity. Berlin will be used as a case study for many of the topics covered, and students will be encouraged to reflect on their own identities and the identities they see enacted around them as they get to know Berlin.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Tuesday
10:00-12:00
(starts: 16.10.)

Room: 0323-26

Topographies of Jewish Identity in Berlin in the 20th and 21st Century

Dr. Russell Alt-Haaker

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Berlin has been home to a heterogeneous Jewish community, from “assimilated” German Jews during the Wilhelmine era, Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe during the Weimar Republic, and people of Jewish heritage who suffered under and sought to flee from the Nazi regime to a small post-war Jewish enclave in a divided Berlin and a vibrant Jewish community after reunification that now draws thousands of others from around the world to the city as their elective home. Through selected essays, satire, newspaper reports, memoirs, poems, photographs and graphic novels, we will discuss how Jewish identity has been negotiated against the backdrop of Berlin’s ever-changing socio-political landscape. In addition to mapping the literary terrain of Jewish identity in Berlin, we will pay special attention to urban sites that have played an important role in this process. As a result, this course pairs written works with a physical exploration of the city to paint a more detailed picture of our readings. Each week, you will be asked to visit a specific site to explore the spaces that feature in the texts or that provide important historical context for our discussions. By scratching the layers of history around us, we will also look at our own identity as elective Berliners and how we inhabit this city as members of the international community.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Tuesday
12:00-14:00
(
starts: 16.10.)

Room: 0323-26

The EAST/WEST Competition - Urban Planning, Cultural Policy And Economics in Divided Berlin

Michael Grass

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Berlin is the city of East / West competition. Since the division of the city into East and West, demonstrating the power of the capitalism and socialism respectively was central to urban planning. Shortly after the war, the solution of obstacles to urban development proved vital, but the ideological usability of economic strategies and architectural prototypes soon became an essential concern urban redevelopment policy of both nations.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

Tuesday
14:00-16:00
(
starts: 16.10.)

Room: 0203

The Social Psychology of Immigration Societies

Dr. Tim Müller / Karolina Fetz

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Modern immigration societies and especially major cities such as Berlin, which are becoming increasingly ethnically and culturally diverse, are facing a number of challenges, such as: issues of racism and discrimination towards immigrants and ethnic minority groups, and conditions necessary for the creation of trust and collaboration between members of different ethnic groups, and for the creation of fair and equitable outcomes with regard to schooling and labour market outcomes. But what are the basic psychological mechanisms shaping social cohesion in modern diverse societies, which are the processes that undermine intergroup relations, and which are the factors that contribute to positive interactions between different groups?

This seminar seeks to target these questions in giving a general overview about classic and contemporary approaches to intergroup relations in the field of social psychology, occasionally drawing on related literature in microsociology.


 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

   

Tuesday
10:00-12:00
(starts: 16.10.2018, ends: 15.01.2019 + 3 excursions 29.10., 27.11., 3.12)

Room: 0203

Berlin, Youthful City

Dr. Michael Kozakowski

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Much of Berlin’s population and economic growth during recent decades has been driven by an influx of young persons, from both elsewhere in Germany and from across the world. The city is globally renowned for its vibrant, youthful culture; its diversity; and the excitement of new possibilities in a place where history looms large.

This course uses the theme of youth to explore Berlin’s (and more broadly, German) culture and history. In other words, it provides a chance to learn about Berlin, to understand German history, and to reflect on different (and changing) forms of youth culture and the student experience.

This course proceeds chronologically, from around 1800 to the present. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach, including articles by professional historians, works of literature, the visual arts, film, and music. It includes recent research on topics such as pop culture, childhood, families, generations, the sociology of universities, and counterculture.

 

 

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Syllabus

 

Wednesday
10:00-12:00
(
starts: 17.10.)

Room: 0323-26

Urban Activism in Berlin

Banu Çiçek Tülü/ Duygu Kaban

(Language requirements: min. English B2, German A2)

 

Berlin has a multi-layered and contradictory landscape; high-rise buildings and gated communities next to squats, dense urban areas next to a huge urban park, etc. Over the course of the 1990s and 2000s, over 50 percent of the city’s public housing stock has been sold to private investors and the city has become a highly desirable destination for international property investment (Holm 2007). The lack of affordable housing and a rise in the speculative real-estate market spur new discussions about gentrification. Meanwhile, inhabitants and newcomers fight for their rights in the city.

 

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Syllabus

 

 

 

Cultural Studies, Literature, Philosophy

 

 

 

Monday
10:00-12:00
(starts: 22.10.)

Room: 0323-26

 

Philosophy in Berlin: Programmatic Writings by Berlin-based Philosophers in the 19th and 20th Century

Benjamin Wilck

(Language requirements: min. English B2, German B2)

 

What is a university, and what is the relation between philosophy and the university? This course explores the origins and objectives of philosophical theories of the university in 19th-century Prussian Berlin, while simultaneously providing a critical perspective on that philosophy’s history from the 20th century until today. The Humboldt University Berlin was founded in 1809/10 under the name ‘Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität’ as a result of calls for university reform by Berlin-based philosophers such as Fichte, Hegel, von Humboldt, and Schleiermacher. Of particular significance was Wilhelm von Humboldt’s plan to create a new kind of university, in which teaching and research would form a unity, in which science would be pursued independently of political and economic interests, and in which students would receive a universal education. Subsequently, Humboldt University Berlin became the paradigm of a new era of university and science. In reading texts written by philosophers before, during, and after the establishment of the Humboldt University, we will trace how ideas relating to the structure and purpose of the university and academic teaching and scientific research changed and were implemented in the course of the last two centuries.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

 

Monday
12:00-10:00
(starts: 22.10.)

Room: 0323-26

Image and the City

Alessa Katharina Paluch

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Capital of Cool, City of Tolerance and (affordable) Hub of Creativity – Berlin’s image is a very alluring one. The images of Berlin circulating in all kinds of media are just as interesting, but also surprisingly diversified. If this is true for contemporary Berlin it proves to be so even more in regard of its 20th century history: historic moments like the fall of the Berlin Wall are always also represented in images. But what do those images actually tell us? What do they mean and what do they want us to see?

This seminar is meant to be an expedition into Berlins and Germanys Visual Culture. We are going to have a closer look on some of these images – ranging from iconic photographs to music video clips to official marketing campaigns – and reflect their symbolic meaning and varying interpretations, their impact on Berlin's self-concept, identity, on its cultural scene and even on its economic value. Basic concepts developed in the context of the Visual Culture Studies are introduced, with aspects of Art History, Film Studies, Metropolitan Studies, Tourism Studies and Social Science.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

 

Tuesday
14:00-18:00
(starts: 16.10.,
ends: 04.12.)

Room: 0323-26

 

Exploring Berlin Museums

Dr. Victoria Bishop-Kendzia

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

This anthropologically inflected course is interdisciplinary in nature. The aim of the course is to explore and critically analyze certain aspects of Berlin’s museological landscape using anthropological methods. This will be realized during the various field trips to relevant sites. The focus is on two particularly visible and conflict-ridden aspects of this landscape, namely the Jewish narrative and the topic of migration.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Tuesday
16:00-18:00
(starts: 16.10.)

Room: 0203

 

Twentieth-Century Berlin: An Urban Historical Perspective

Lily Philipose

(Language requirements: min. English B2)

 

Urban history is a form of historical inquiry that enriches our understanding of cities and urban landscapes, often using an interdisciplinary approach. This course is an introduction to specific points of interest in the political, social and cultural developments in Berlin be-tween the 1920s and the 1990s, showing how they illuminate German twentieth-century history. It links city sites, monuments and buildings to collective memory and political de-bates.

We learn about the fascinating stories of twentieth-century political events, places, people, buildings and monuments in Berlin presented by three urban historians, and we also learn the basic principles and approaches of urban history. We make urban history come alive through audio-guide narrated city walks, develop our own piece of micro-history by re-searching neighborhoods, and take part in an urban preservation project — restoration of the Alexander Haus in Groß Glienicke — that brings this city’s urban history into the present.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

 

Wednesday
12:00-14:00

(starts: 17.10.)

Room: 0323-26

 

Berlin: Literature, History & Politics in the 20th and 21st Century

Idan Gillo / Friederike Knüpling

(Language requirements: min. English B2 / German A1-A2)

 

This course explores the city of Berlin through key contemporary and twentieth century prose as well as poems, films, and music. Class discussions will focus on Berlin as the stage for crucial events in world history and on representations of the city in German literature. Topics include contemporary Berlin as a magnet for international bohemians and hipsters, migration to Berlin, the fall of the Berlin wall, student movements and radical politics in the city, cold war Berlin, the city under National Socialism, Weimar republic, revolutionary times, and the German Empire. We will read and discuss Walter Benjamin, Rosa Luxemburg, Paul Celan, Alfred Döblin, Hans Fallada, Emine Sevgi Özdamar and others. 

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Wednesday
16:00-18:00

(starts: 17.10.)

Room: 0323-26

 

Berlin in the Twentieth Century: A Cultural Topography

Dr. Rositza Alexandrova

(Language requirements: min. English B2, German A1-A2)

 

Taking Andrew J. Webber’s eponymous recent study on Berlin as our updated travel guide to the physical localities of literature, art, political strife and philosophical resignation in the German capital, we will explore the constant interpretative effort that is encapsulated in a walk and consider perambulation itself as a scriptural paradigm. To this end, we will alternate our intensive seminar sessions with journeys to significant “Schauplätze der Evidenz”, libraries, museums, commemorative facades and relegated clubs, but also authors’ lived interiors, street corners and kiosks, as well as iconic urban areas and architectural emblems. In preparation for these field trips, we will read each time a chapter from our primer in English and decide on short German-language excerpts from the works addressed in this particular chapter, which we will then read and discuss in class. Such close textual and sometimes film analysis in this dual linguistic modality will allow us to reflect not least on theories of translation and intercultural transfer, in which accented expression, infelicities of meaning and even irritant code switching combine to strengthen and enrich the process of academic integration.

 

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

 

Thursday
10:00-12:00

(starts: 18.10.)

Room: 0323-26

Berlin Films

Dr. Stefanie Rinke

(Language requirements: min. English B1, German B1)

 

A lot of films are made in Berlin, but not every film could be called a „Berlin Film“. A film is a Berlin Film, so the definition in class, when the film shows special places of Berlin, when it shows a particular life-style or specific historical, cultural or political events. Only Berlin Films construct the identity of the metropole Berlin and are part of the thick space of a metropole: are intermingled in (imaginary) city relations. This seminar is ideal for students who wish to further their German skills.

 

 

 

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Syllabus

 

       

Seminar overview of all Berlin Perspectives seminars

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